Local artist takes part in Titanic performance

The performance artists from Bbeyond in action. INLM1612-300con
The performance artists from Bbeyond in action. INLM1612-300con

LURGAN artist Paul King was involved in a piece of performance art as part of the Titanic anniversary celebrations.

Paul’s part in the performance art piece involved him walking around for two hours with a very full glass of water - he assures us it’s much tougher than it sounds.

Paul King is a picture of concentration. INLM1612-301con

Paul King is a picture of concentration. INLM1612-301con

The conceptual project took place in the Titanic building on Monday, April 2, to mark the day, 100 years ago when the Titanic was tested to see if it was seaworthy.

41-year-old Paul was invited by artist Alastair MacLennan to be involved in a performance organised alongside American performance artist Marilyn Arsem called ‘Holding Time’.

The piece involved narrators reciting texts, diary entries, newspaper reports and other relevant material relating to the Harland and Wolff shipyard on April 2, 1912.

Paul said: “While this was being recited, we the performance artists from Bbeyond, walked through the room and the audience whilst holding a large glass filled to near overflowing with water.

Performance artists mingle with the audience. INLM1612-302con

Performance artists mingle with the audience. INLM1612-302con

“We had to walk very slowly so as not to spill the water, this walk across the room in the Titanic Belfast building lasted for an hour, this whole performance was done twice on the day, morning and then afternoon.”

As well as being a member of Bbeyond, a group committed to promoting the practice of performance art and artists in Northern Ireland and further afield, Paul also runs North Armagh Artists Collective.

He added: “We were all wearing carnations and we had to dress in black with no shoes. It was to make it a solemn occasion. The carrying of the water can be interpreted in different ways.

“We were walking so slow as to not spill a drop. If any spilled, Alastair came round with a jug to fill us up again. Thankfully no one got soaked.

“It doesn’t look like much, but if you were to try it you’d soon know about it.

“Performance artists are used to doing this kind of thing. We were all sore by the end of it. You’re using muscles you wouldn’t normally use.”